About Denise

I help women who are going through life transitions to rediscover a new level of health and happiness, and to create lives that are happy, healthy and whole again. Using a holistic approach, we explore how all areas of life are connected. Helping clients let go of what’s not working allows them to make room for what they love. Parenting, relationships, unsatisfying jobs and hectic lifestyles take a toll on health and happiness.

*Health issues like thyroid disorders or other autoimmune diseases frequently go hand in hand with feeling overwhelmed and stressed. If that’s the case, or if you feel like you’ve been struggling to get your doctor to pay attention, I am happy to support you to learn about the lifestyle changes that you may wish to explore alongside of your medical care. I can support you to become an advocate for your own health as you work with your doctor.

Through my signature coaching process, we'll explore The 7 C’s: Confidence, Clarity, Connection, Courage, Choice, Commitment and Change.

I’m a Certified Professional Coach, former teacher, and mom of two grown and flown young adults. 

I received rave reviews yesterday for my hard work over the past few weeks. I am so blessed to have found my true “calling” and I know I owe much of it to you – you are a GREAT coach, Denise!!!!
— Heather Daddea, PA

 

My background

I am passionate about helping women balance the many facets of their lives to create harmony and fulfillment. I am a Certified Professional Coach (CPC). I completed my certification studies at iPEC, the Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching. A graduate of Boston College, I was an Advertising Account Executive for a fast-paced Fortune 500 company, balancing a full-time career while raising two young children. Choosing to stay at home with my family and volunteer in the community led me to teach and inspire young children. Teaching preschool for thirteen years, I have empowered countless parents to move forward in their lives with direction and confidence. 


My story

I thought that raising kids would be pretty straightforward. Our shared goal has always been to raise strong, self-confident, compassionate and independent children who will grow up to be happy and successful in the world. It’s not quite as simple as it sounds, as you probably realize. I found myself questioning my own values, and wondering whether I was giving them enough of what they needed. I learned a lot about myself as I learned to parent confidently.

I grew up in a home where success meant striving for perfection. It was important to get good grades, for others to reinforce that I was worthy based on my grades, my behavior, classes that I took, activities that I got involved with. If I got anything less than a 100, my parents would “jokingly” ask “where were you when the teacher taught the other points?” Yes, getting it right was the key to success. A successful career was a practical career, whether or not it was interesting. I didn’t really even know that I could question this, as silly as that may sound.

So, when I had children of my own, I found myself being boxed into that same world of “shoulds.” On top of the things that I felt I should do based on my upbringing, there were so many external pressures to do raise kids a certain way. Sports, activities, permissiveness, gender roles, manners, expectations all became things to think about. Raising kids was more complex than I imagined.

Creating a clear value system was important to me. Communicating and instilling it to each child meant respecting and honoring their individual personalities and capabilities. I learned that it’s not really fair or effective to treat kids in the exact same way, because it’s important to teach based on their own learning styles and capabilities. Bottom line messages were the same, but my style varied in approach.

What I learned is that there is no Right Path to raising children. Every family, and in fact every child, is different. Raising kids is not a cookie-cutter formula. I respect the individuality of my two children, and learned that my parenting messages sometimes need to be sent differently. We hear about treating kids equally. I learned that equally does not mean the same. It’s not fair or equal to use the same parenting techniques with each child, because they are very much independent and confident thinkers with their own approaches to life.

Creating confidence begins in the early years. I began teaching responsibility early on. I helped them to see choices, to experience the outcome of their decisions, and to feel the impact of their choices. Natural consequences are a great way to build self-confidence and independent thinking. It’s not as hard as it sounds, although sometimes I had to just remind myself to breathe. Learning to make decisions and live with them is easier and safer when the kids are younger. There’s little danger involved, and a lot of opportunity to experience consequences.

I felt like sometimes I was raising my kids in my own little world because I wasn’t willing to give in and go along with the crowd. I learned to say no, and to stick to what I said. It wasn’t always easy, and my kids didn’t appreciate it at the time, but it was based on what I felt was best. It’s my job to raise my kids in a safe world. Not every family has the same values. Understanding that children sometimes don’t have the tools to really share things that are strange or uncomfortable to them is a lesson I learned in hindsight. Being more judicious, yet not judging, is a line that we balance as parents.